Back at it…YouTubing that is

Do you ever run out of stuff to write about…yeah me neither but sometimes, I get tired of typing so I’m restarting my channel on YouTube. Yep that’s right, I’m sharing spur of the moment thoughts about all things pertaining to a writer’s life in hopefully under three minutes!

Check it out. Subscribe or just like a video or two. I hope to inspire you to keep pushing and letting the words flow. And maybe make you laugh a little along the way.

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The Right Time to Write

There is never a right time to write but always time to write whether the time is right or not. Sometimes you just have to start writing or typing to let the story flow. Planning helps but when your mind drifts to the perfect line or scene don’t wait to get it out.

I use to keep notes on my phone but now I carry a small notepad in my purse so I can capture my thoughts. I don’t know what it is about holding a pen and jointing down details or some character’s voice but it feels better than thumbing it into a piece of technology.

But that’s my chosen tool of creative channeling. What’s yours? Whatever it is, just remember to use it whenever you can. It’s still great to have a routine dedicated time to writing but do you think Micheal Jackson only made music each Sunday at noon? Or Maya wrote poetry after working an eight-hour shift? Not likely.

Get your words out, whenever and however you need to. Your legacy depends on it.

Oh, and one of the moments I chose to just get words out is now being published in an anthology by Z Publishing. So these are words that I can testify to. I’ve lived and are still living each syllable. I’ll let you know when America’s Emerging Writers – Atlanta edition is out so you can go grab a copy and see what got picked up. Hint: It’s a fictional young adult fantasy piece (Yay, I write that too).

Until next time…

With passion,

DNC

The Drafting Twilight Zone: Tips for getting it out and over

So you’ve unlocked your writing with your key of imagination and as you move through it you fall through to a dimension of sentence structures; a dimension of grammatical woes; a dimension of endless prose. You’ve moved into a novel with multiple character development and plot twists. You’ve just crossed over into the Drafting Twilight Zone.

Yep. The story of my life right now. Even though I feel like I’m so close to finishing the first draft of my next book, I can’t stop going back and wanting to add subplots and gradual detail. All stuff that I don’t even know you guys need but I feel is necessary.

In hopes of getting out to this whack ass drafting dimension of insanity, I took some time to see how the pros have handled this.

Try Stephen King’s technique that he shared in On Writing, which he learned back in high school. It’s a simple formula:

2nd draft = 1st draft – 10%

So he states that,

“Even today, I will aim for a second-draft length of thirty-six hundred words if the draft of a novel runs three hundred and fifty thousand words, I’ll try my damndest to produce a second draft of no more than three hundred and fifteen thousand … three hundred, if possible. Usually it is possible. What the Formula taught me is that every story and novel is collapsible to some degree.”

Great words. But this is for the second draft, which I’m kind of in but not totally. So then I found pretty nifty advice from Sarah Waters.

“Don’t panic. Midway through writing a novel, I have regularly experienced moments of bowel-curdling terror, as I contemplate the drivel on the screen before me and see beyond it, in quick succession, the derisive reviews, the friends’ embarrassment, the failing career, the dwindling income, the repossessed house, the divorce . . . Working doggedly on through crises like these, however, has always got me there in the end. Leaving the desk for a while can help. Talking the problem through can help me recall what I was trying to achieve before I got stuck. Going for a long walk almost always gets me thinking about my manuscript in a slightly new way. And if all else fails, there’s prayer. St Francis de Sales, the patron saint of writers, has often helped me out in a crisis. If you want to spread your net more widely, you could try appealing to Calliope, the muse of epic poetry, too.”

Good advice but a bit vague. Then I ran into Neil Gaiman’s words, who’s the author of American Gods—a novel and show that I just devoured. He gives me exactly what I needed, and wanted, to hear.

“The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. (That may be a rule for life as well as for writing. But it’s definitely true for writing.) So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure that there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.”

So guys, it seems that the only way out of the “Drafting Twilight Zone” is through. Full steam ahead bishes! My hope is that once I’ve finally finished this process, an ingeniously articulated masterpiece is created for yout reading delight. Here goes nothing.

As I glue myself to my writing chair, focused on finally knocking this out, be sure to check out my free short story series on this blog. Catch up. Don’t be lame. Friday is always a great day to read.

DNC’s Short Story Series Presents: “Complicated

#Writerslife Proposals, Pitching, Queries…oh my!

This week, I stopped by one of my favorite podcasts, Writing Excuses, and caught this great one on all of the above.

They really tackle some of the old vs. new outlook on pitching, proposals and queries.

Even if you’re not at this place yet, it’s great to keep these thoughts, tips and tricks in your back pocket.

Writingexcuses_proposals

Stay passionate!

-DNC